Webinar: Designing for Adolescents in Mental Health Crisis: A Story of Research, Innovation, and Hope

We are a proud sponsor of the upcoming webinar: Designing for Adolescents in Mental Health Crisis: A Story of Research, Innovation, and Hope

Adolescence can be a tumultuous time in one’s life. Mental health conditions often surface during this stage, and it may be the first time that some patients enter an inpatient behavioral health unit. How can design best support this patient population that is transitioning from childhood to adulthood? Learn how a design team utilized research, Lean processes, and innovation to solve the challenges of this unique patient population for the 27-bed Adolescent Behavioral Health Unit in Tacoma, Washington. Find out how design can support a seclusion- and restraint-free care model and how pushing beyond the conventions of behavioral healthcare design was achieved.

Learning Objectives:

  • Hear current trends in behavioral healthcare models that impact the design of the built environment.
  • Examine how research influenced and contributed to shaping the environment and the attitudes of clinical operations, design, and construction teams.
  • Learn about highly specialized spaces and innovations in behavioral health design that contribute to improved safety for patients and staff.
  • Learn how Lean tools were utilized to quickly gain consensus, innovate, meet an aggressive project schedule, and achieve goals.

Register here.

Top Healthcare Design Links in March

Below are our top 3 healthcare design links in March:

New Product Alert – Carson Sleeper
Everyone must be interested in getting more sleep as our post on our new Carson sleeper received the most attention we’ve seen in a while! It’s no wonder, this sleeper is user-friendly and its bench is ideal for patient rooms where space is at a premium.

Partnership with The Center for Health Design
This month we were happy to announce our partnership with The Center for Health Design.  Together we are producing some great tools and educational opportunities related to designing for behavioral and mental health. Most recently we were involved in the launch of the Behavioral Health toolbox.  View the tool box here.

3 Crucial Considerations When Design A Waiting Room
Our latest blog post was a hit! Waiting happens in almost every healthcare setting, which is why it’s design is so important in healthcare design. The 3 crucial considerations discussed in this blog post include overall layout, furniture selection and incorporating design elements.

3 Crucial Considerations for Healthcare Waiting Room Design & Layout

Waiting happens in almost every healthcare setting – from the initial check-in, diagnosis, and treatment to anticipating a disease outcome. Although the actual waiting time varies in different types of facilities, the waiting experience is usually tedious and even stressful for many patients and their families. Therefore, it’s imperative to provide patients with a waiting experience and incorporate a waiting room design that reduces negativity and promotes calmness and wellbeing. There are three crucial considerations for waiting room design that will give a positive, comfortable and welcoming experience for patients.

Waiting Room Design

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Waiting Room Design – Overall Layout

Have a solid understanding of where patients enter and exit the establishment.  Signage should be strategically placed ensuring patients know where to go when they arrive.  Your waiting room design should be open enough to allow foot traffic to flow freely, and if possible, patients should not have to retrace their steps or cross paths with other patients.

  1. Waiting Room Design – Furniture Selection

The most important part of your waiting room design is your furniture specification; providing patients with their first impression and ultimately their comfort level in your space.  The focal point of a waiting room is usually the reception desk. It should be easily viewable and accessible from the entrance. Choose a reception desk that has adequate storage and a shape and finish that compliments your décor. Seating needs to be comfortable and attractive and have a variety of options; giving patients control as to where they sit. Decide how much furniture you’ll need; how many waiting chairs will be used on your busiest day and add tables to allow patients to have a place for drinks, purses, phones and reading material. Finally, any upholstered furniture needs to be healthcare grade quality and easy-to-clean to avoid healthcare-acquired infections.

  1. Waiting Room Design – Design Elements

In a medical environment, colors should be calm and tranquil. Color elements can be in the form of paint on a wall or artwork such as paintings and photography.  Blue provides a sense of calm and peacefulness that can put people at ease. Beige is also calming and can help reflect light, making the waiting room appear warmer and airier.  Brown is a great complimentary color when paired with something lighter. In your waiting room design, consideration should also be given to utilizing different sources of light to create a welcoming waiting room design. Natural light with a view of the outdoors provides a welcome distraction to those who are waiting.

Ultimately the goal is to provide a functional layout while combining lighting, furnishings and color for a positive and soothing waiting experience.

NEW – Carson Sleeper

Carson Sofa Sleeper or Bench Sleeper

The Carson Sleeper is user-friendly and easy to clean. Featuring custom widths, this sleeper is  highly accomodative to the space constraints of patient rooms. Available as a sleep sofa with back and arms, or a compact bench sleeper; providing a small footprint.

This sleeper features concealed heavy-duty drawer slide mechanisms, an accommodative sleeper surface, choice of wood, polyurethane or solid surface arm caps, choice of casters or wood legs and contrasting fabrics.

Tune in on March 9th at 2pm EST for our Facebook Live broadcast where you will have the opportunity to see the Carson sofa transform into a sleeper live.

Partnership With The Center for Health Design

Header - Partnership with the center for health design

Ontario, Canada – Stance Healthcare, a manufacturer of furniture for healing environments, has partnered with The Center for Health Design (CHD), the principal provider of healthcare design research, education and advocacy.

The partnership focuses on evidence-based design tools, resources and educational opportunities for behavioral and mental health design. More specifically, the creation of a topic toolbox, informational webinars, an interactive workshop and a continuing education course.

Launched in February, the Behavioral & Mental Health toolbox contains a library of newly-created and CHD staff-curated content – research findings, expert insights, strategies, tools, and other useful resources connecting the built environment to better health outcomes and reduced cost of care. Stance Healthcare’s partnership with the CHD has made these toolbox materials available and free to all until March 2019. A CEU course approved for AIA/EDAC credit will also be available later this year.

On September 27th Stance Healthcare is proud to sponsor a Behavioral Health workshop focused on Strategic Facility Design Innovations that Improve Treatment Outcomes, Safety and the Bottom Line. Taking place in Baltimore, Maryland, attendees will gain insight into existing standards and behavioral health models, strategies that address behavioral health across various population groups, design methodologies that hinder or enhance behavioral health and case studies of state-of-the-art facilities that support behavioral health.

“With one in five adults being affected by a behavioral and mental health condition in the U.S. each year, it’s important to understand how design can provide patients with a healing and therapeutic environment,” says Carl Kennedy, President. “We appreciate the value The Center for Health Design brings to the industry, and are pleased to have the opportunity to partner with them on this behavioral and mental health initiative.”

To access the complete toolbox, click here.

To register for the workshop, click here.

Top Healthcare Design Links In February

Below are our top 3 healthcare design links in February:

6 Tips for Taking Good Install Photos On Your Smart Phone
Last month we shared a post on how to take good install pics on your smart phone.  Tips included; choosing the right perspective, clearing the clutter, choosing correct lighting, use a tripod, lock the focus and choosing the right angle.

4 Tips for Designing the Hospital of the Future
Using an evidence-based design (EBD) approach, DLR Group determined the hospital of the future includes lighting and temperature controlled by patients, personal information systems through an interactive television, acuity-adaptable rooms and more.

How to Effectively Use Color in Treatment Facilities
This article admits there is no one-size-fits-all approach in using color in treatment center design, there are some general tips.  The color shouldn’t jump out, but instead feel light and happy in the space. Accent colors to consider for treatment centers include pastel hues of blue and green; warm purple or violet; warm yellow and orange; and taupe.

6 Tips for Taking Good Install Photos on Your Smart Phone

We all love looking at beautiful installation photos.  They help us feel inspired and provide the ability to visualize the vast variations of furniture and fabric options available. When you send us your pictures of Stance Healthcare furniture in healing environments, you could receive $150!*  It’s also an excellent way for you to promote your project and gain exposure.  Did I mention you could receive $150?  If you’re not comfortable with taking photos of furniture and healthcare interiors, I’ve included some guidelines below to help you get started:

  1. Choose the Right Perspective.
    Think about the furniture piece you want to capture before taking the photo. Think about if you want to photograph one piece of furniture or an entire healthcare space. Walk around the room and see where the best view is to capture the overall essence of the furniture in its environment.
  1. Clear the Clutter
    Keep it simple.  The environment should be clear of any clutter, enabling the piece of furniture to be the focal point. Remove magazines and pamphlets from tables and pillows from chairs.  If in doubt – take it out. 
  1. Choose the Correct Lighting
    The type of lighting found in healthcare environments may not necessarily be conducive to taking photos.  However, turn off your flash and take advantage of using as much natural light as possible. Nowadays, hospitals are built with more natural light to promote well-being, so make sure to open up the blinds. The light should fill the entire area you are photographing.  The best time to take photos that incorporate natural light is in the morning or late in the afternoon.
  1. Use A Tripod
    If possible, use a tripod.  This is especially important in low lighting to help prevent blurriness. It can also help ensure your photos are level. There are many options available for inexpensive compact smart phone tripods – some are even able to wrap around poles, have magnetic feet and a remote shutter!
  1. Lock the Focus
    If you want to prevent your smartphone from attempting to grab a different subject in the frame, lock the focal point on the furniture you want to capture. To do this, simply tap your phone screen on the key furniture piece you want to focus on and your smartphone will do the rest!
  1. Choose the Right Angle
    To highlight the furniture in the healing space, you will likely want to take your photo horizontally.  You’ll also want to make sure you hold the phone flat to the wall to prevent any distortion.  Move around the room taking at least 5 – 10 photos and you’ll be sure to have at least one winning photograph!

If all else fails, hire a photographer to take the photo for you 😉

This post was written in collaboration with David Briggs Photography.

accent_install

Top Healthcare Design Links for January

Below are our top 3 healthcare design links for January:

Marna Healthcare Seating Collection
We recently launched Marna, a new collection of healthcare seating that combines modern, minimalist aesthetics with robust engineering methods that exceed all requirements of outstanding performance in healthcare environments. Features and options include a limited lifetime warranty, 14-gauge internal steel seat frame, removable seat and back upholstery covers, wood side frames, flex-back option, custom wood frame finishes, contrasting fabrics and more!

Care close to home: Microhospitals help bridge the gap between ambulatory and tertiary facilities
Mircrohospitals are becoming a big thing in healthcare design.  This article discusses their ability to respond to the needs of lower-acuity patients as well as providing local residents with the comfort and convenience of having access to both nearby health care services and a more extensive network of care.

5 Elements for a Healthy Medical Lounge
In this article you’ll find the five elements that make the healthcare lounge work including giving it a hospitality feel, ensuring it has daylighting or connection to the exterior, having furniture that is flexible, making it visible and easy to access and having the design integrated into the entire healthcare project.

NEW – Marna Seating Collection

Marna Series - High Res

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Marna Healthcare Seating Collection combines modern, minimalist aesthetics with robust engineering methods that exceed all necessary requirements for outstanding performance in healthcare environments.

Features and options include a limited lifetime warranty, 14-gauge internal steel seat frame, removable seat and back upholstery covers, wood side frames, flex-back option, custom wood frame finishes, contrasting fabrics and more!

You can see Marna’s sleek lines for yourself during a Facebook Live broadcast on February 1st at 2pm with our sales specialist Tracey. You will also have the opportunity to see our newest addition to wood seating in person at NeoCon in June.

caliber_room (2)

5 Considerations: Specifying Behavioral Healthcare Furniture

1 in 5 patients admitted to an acute psychiatric unit may commit an act of violence, and between 75% and 100% of nursing staff on acute psychiatric units have been assaulted by a patient at some stage in their careers. That’s an alarming number!  Fortunately, there are things a facility can do to minimize the risk to patients, staff, and visitors. Investing in furnishings specifically designed and manufactured for behavioral health facilities is one consideration.

Here are five things to consider when purchasing furnishings for your next Behavioral Health project:

Safety
This is the most important consideration when specifying furniture for behavioral health facilities.  Seating designed for safety will inhibit concealment, feature anti-ligature components, have no sharp points or edges, include tamper-resistant hardware, break-resistant glides, and floor-wall mount options.

Durability
Furniture can help combat self-destructive behavior; it should be movable, yet too heavy to throw. Tables and seating finishes should be specified to deter destruction that leads to objects that can inflict harm to themselves and others.  High-pressure laminate, solid surface, and polyurethane surfaces are application specific finish options and can be used where appropriate. Specifying healthcare-grade upholstery materials provides additional durability.

Aesthetics
It’s true – the behavioral health landscape has changed.  The principles of Concierge Healthcare Design are being applied to Behavioral Health Facilities to help ease the anxiety of patients, caregivers, and caretakers.  Furniture is specified with residential appeal, and materials should be specified for their symbolic meaning rather than for pure functionality. Avoid complex patterns, color stimulation, and reflective surfaces.

Infection Control
Healthcare-acquired infections are always a concern in any healthcare setting. Seating should be easy-to-clean with a 3-way clean sweep around seat cushions, contain no crevices that encourage concealment and provide textiles and finishes that withstand stringent cleaning agents.

Comfort
Furniture should be selected to help patients, and visitors feel at ease. Upholstered furniture provides the ultimate comfort for seating.  Multiple types of seating and sizes should also be specified to give patients and visitors the choice of finding furniture most comfortable for them.